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Standard of Vocational Education

Content

Standard of Vocational Education - content
Issuer:Government
Type:regulation
In force from:20.04.2019
In force until: In force
Translation published:15.01.2020

Standard of Vocational Education

Passed 26.08.2013 No. 130
RT I, 28.08.2013, 13
Entry into force 01.09.2013

Amended by the following legal instruments (show)

PassedPublishedEntry into force
14.07.2016RT I, 16.07.2016, 501.09.2016, partially 01.01.2017
14.06.2018RT I, 19.06.2018, 1522.06.2018
11.04.2019RT I, 17.04.2019, 120.04.2019

The regulation is established on the basis of Section 22 of the Vocational Educational Institutions Act.

Chapter 1 General Provisions 

§ 1.  Scope of application of regulation

  The regulation establishes a set of uniform requirements for formal education in vocational training taking place in a vocational educational institution or institution of professional higher education carrying out vocational training (hereinafter school), including learning outcomes and their connections to the qualifications framework established in the Professions Act, the curriculum and functions and requirements of education, principles for amending the curriculum, principles for recognition of prior learning and professional experience and a list of broad groups of study, fields of study and curriculum groups.

§ 2.  Vocational training inputs

 (1) The content of the vocational training is based on professional standards and, in their absence, on input from social partners and the recommendation1 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning.

 (2) In addition to the provisions of subsection 1, the content of vocational secondary education is based additionally on the national curriculum for upper secondary schools.

§ 3.  Studies and completion of studies

  [RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (1) Studies are a students’ activity in the study and work environment for achieving the goals and learning outcomes set out in the curriculum and they take place as face-to-face learning, work practice and independent work.

 (2) Studies in both the physical and virtual study environment and under a teacher’s guidance take place as face-to-face learning, including practical work.

 (3) Studies in the work environment under the supervision of a supervisor take place as work practice.

 (4) Studies in the course of which students independently carry out study and work assignments with specific goals and which are subject to feedback from the teacher shall take place as independent work. Independent work shall make up at least 15 per cent of the total volume of studies in the case of full-time form of study and over 50% of the total volume of studies in the case of non-stationary form of study.

 (5) [Repealed - RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (6) Studies shall conclude with a professional examination or vocational examination, the goal of which is to ensure that the vocational training graduate has achieved all of the learning outcomes set forth in the curriculum.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (7) The organization of the professional examination is governed by the Professions Act and the terms and conditions and procedure for the vocational examination are governed by the rules for organization of studies.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (8) The choice of profession curriculum shall be considered completed after the learning outcomes described in the curriculum have been achieved.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

§ 4.  Awarding of credit for study

 (1) In vocational training, the credit is awarded for study in Estonian vocational education credit points (hereinafter credit point). One credit point corresponds to 26 hours spent by the student on acquiring knowledge and skills. The volume of study per academic year is 60 credit points. The acronym EKAP is used as the abbreviation for credit point.

 (2) The Estonian vocational education credit point system is a framework for describing learning outcomes, recognizing, transferring and accumulating them The learning outcomes may be achieved through formal, non-formal or informal study. The school has the right to adjust study so that the objectives and learning outcomes set out in the curriculum are achieved within a period shorter or longer than the average period of study.

Chapter 2 Curricula 

§ 5.  Curricula

 (1) Curricula are divided into national curricula and school curricula.

 (2) The curriculum determines the goals, objectives and functions of vocational, professional and occupational training, the learning outcomes to be achieved and links with the qualifications framework established in the Professions Act, the requirements for commencement and completion of studies, modules of the curriculum and their volume along with learning outcomes and assessment criteria, options and conditions for choosing modules and specialisation opportunities. The professional standards are the basis for determining the partial professions to be acquired in the course of study.

§ 6.  National curriculum

 (1) The national curriculum is the fundamental document on the basis of which the vocational secondary education curriculum is prepared.

 (2) The national curriculum is prepared in cooperation with social partners, on the basis of the Standard of Vocational Education, relevant professional standards and the national curriculum for upper secondary schools.

 (3) If the professional standard serving as the basis for the national curriculum is repealed, a new professional standard shall be established, the name of the professional standard or the professional skill requirements therein shall be changed or if another need for change should emerge, the national curriculum will be reviewed and, if necessary, re-established.

§ 7.  School curriculum

 (1) The school curriculum is the document on which studies are based. School curricula are divided into initial training and continuing training curricula. Both the initial training and continuing training curriculum may be prepared as a joint curriculum.

 (2) The school shall prepare a curriculum for the specific level in the qualification framework established in the Professions Act (hereinafter qualification level). The school may prepare a curriculum for professions and areas of specialization allowing specialization in different professions or areas of specialization.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (3) If, on the basis of the curriculum, it is possible to obtain several professions or partial professions, the curriculum shall set out the modules, achieving of whose learning outcomes is a prerequisite for obtaining a specific profession or partial profession.

 (4) The cooperation agreement on the joint curriculum determines the school that operates under the cooperation agreement as the steward of the joint curriculum, registers the joint curriculum and students commencing studies there in the Estonian Education Information System and issues leaving certificates and other final graduation documents to graduates of the joint curriculum.

 (5) The steward of the joint curriculum shall provide at least half of the education to be provided on the basis of the joint curriculum.

 (6) The requirement set forth in subsection 5 of this section shall not be applied to joint curricula in which foreign educational institutions participate.

§ 8.  Curriculum modules

 (1) A curriculum consists of modules.

 (2) A module is an integral unit of content of the curriculum, and describes the learning outcomes that are in conformity with competence requirements.

 (3) The volume of the module in credit points depends on the objective and learning outcomes of the module.

 (4) Modules are divided into core studies, elective studies and general studies modules.

 (5) Core studies modules define the learning outcomes and compulsory specialization choices for operating in a vocational, professional and occupational area.

 (6) The core studies modules integrate, in the volume and selection necessary for acquisition of the relevant qualification, continuation of studies and entering the labour market, the learning outcomes in the area of key competencies set forth in the section of this regulation setting out the vocational training learning outcomes at the relevant level.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (7) Elective studies modules determine the learning outcomes that support and expand professional skills or are related to an additional profession or partial profession or support the acquisition of key competences. The elective modules shall generally make up 15-30 per cent of the volume of the curriculum, and in the case of a curriculum with a volume of up to 30 credit points, 15 per cent of the volume of the curriculum; and they shall be specified in the school curriculum. Students have the right to select elective modules from the school’s other curricula or from other educational institutions’ curricula in accordance with the procedure set forth in the school’s rules for organization of studies.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (8) The learning outcomes for core and elective studies modules are described through vocational and professional knowledge, skills, extent of independence and responsibility, learning competence, communication skills, self-determination competence, performance competence, information technology competence and initiative and entrepreneurial competence, which are defined as follows:
 1) vocational and professional knowledge is information acquired in the course of the study process regarding vocational, professional and occupational facts, principles, theories and practices;
 2) vocational and professional skills are the capability of applying knowledge and using them for performing duties and resolving problems; the skills are described through their complexity and diversity;
 3) the extent of independence and responsibility is the level at which the graduate is able to work independently and take responsibility for their performance;
 4) learning competence is the ability to manage his or her learning activity using learning strategies and a suitable learning style;
 5) communication competence is the ability to communicate orally and in written form in different situations and on different topics;
 6) self-determination competence is the ability to understand and evaluate himself or herself, make sense of his or her actions and behaviour in society, develop his or her personality;
 7) performance competence is the ability to visualize problems and solve them, plan his or her activities, set goals for activity and envision the expected results, select methods, take action, evaluate the results of his or her activities and engage in cooperation;
 8) information technology competence is the ability to skilfully and critically use information technology devices and digital media;
 9) initiative and entrepreneurial competence is the ability to act in a proactive and creative way and plan his or her career in the contemporary economic, entrepreneurial and work environment, using the acquired knowledge and skills in different walks of life and areas of activity.

 (9) The general studies modules determine the common learning outcomes in study in key competences for all vocational secondary education curricula.

§ 9.  Adjustment and amendment of school curriculum

 (1) A school may adjust the curriculum according to the students’ target group and form of study.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (2) Upon adjusting the curriculum, the school may change the content, selection and proportion of elective studies in the curriculum, and if necessary increase the proportion of work practice, thereby ensuring that the learning outcomes of the curriculum are attainable.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (3) In the case of adjustments to the curriculum specified in subsection 32 (8) of the Vocational Educational Institutions Act, an individual curriculum is drawn up for the student.

Chapter 3 Second-level Vocational Training 

§ 10.  Second-level vocational training

 (1) Students in second-level vocational training acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes that correspond to the learning outcomes of the second qualification level.

 (2) A graduate of second-level vocational training has vocational, professional and occupational training that is in general sufficient for working in professions categorized under the major group “Elementary occupations” in the ISCO-08 (International Standard Classification of Occupations; 2008).

 (3) Study in second-level vocational training takes place solely on the basis of initial training curricula.

 (4) Those starting study in second-level vocational training are not required to have basic education.

 (5) Choice of profession is formal study in preparation for vocational training under which the learning outcomes of the second qualification level and readiness for continuing studies and entering the labour market are achieved.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (6) Choice of profession training takes place solely in the full-time form of study.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (7) To carry out choice of profession training, the school shall prepare a choice of profession curriculum.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

§ 11.  Volume of study

 (1) The volume of second-level vocational training is 30 to 120 credit points and in choice of profession training, 30 credit points. In exceptions, the minister responsible for the field may grant consent for opening a choice of profession curriculum with a volume of 60 credit points.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (2) Practical work and work practice together make up at least 70 per cent of the volume of vocational training.

 (3) In the choice of profession curriculum, elective studies make up 70% of the volume of the curriculum and core studies make up 30 per cent of the volume of the curriculum.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

§ 12.  Completion of studies and continuation of studies

 (1) Studies in second-level vocational training shall be considered complete after achieving the learning outcomes corresponding to the partial profession or qualification described in the curriculum.

 (11) The choice of profession curriculum shall be considered completed after achieving the learning outcomes described in the curriculum, which are assessed in a non-differentiated manner.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (2) The achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a professional examination, which may also be taken in parts. If it is not possible to take a professional examination in a profession or area of specialization, the studies shall be completed with a vocational examination. If the professional examination is not passed, the student has the right to take a vocational examination to complete studies. In the case of a student with special educational needs, the achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a vocational examination, which can be substituted by a professional examination. [RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (3) The school shall issue a leaving certificate along with a transcript to graduates of second-level vocational training.

 (4) Students in second-level vocational training may acquire basic education under the general procedure simultaneously with or after studies in vocational training.

§ 13.  Learning outcomes for second-level vocational training

 (1) Graduates of second-level vocational training shall have achieved the learning outcomes set out in this section.

 (2) Vocational and professional knowledge:
 1) knows and describes the essential vocational and professional terms and principles;
 2) understands the main processes in their work, is familiar with professional terminology, materials, tools and the equipment used the most.

 (3) Vocational and professional skills and extent of independence and responsibility:
 1) is able to fulfil conventional work assignments with limited responsibility in his or her vocation or profession;
 2) is able to fulfil work assignments under supervision;
 3) works effectively in work situations that are generally stable.

 (4) Learning competence: learns under consultation and guidance.

 (5) Communicative competence:
 1) is able to communicate in habitual situations and with conventional partners in interaction;
 2) uses advice, assistance and support as well as information materials for resolving vocational and professional issues.

 (6) Self-determination competence: is able to assess the results of his or her work at consultation.

 (7) Performance competence: under supervision, adjusts to and copes in various social environments.

 (8) Information technology competence:
 1) knows some of the possibilities of information technology;
 2) is able to use the internet to some extent;
 3) is able to use some applications under supervision.

 (9) Initiative and entrepreneurial competence:
 1) is able to express ideas and, under supervision, implement them;
 2) under supervision, from among the possibilities given, makes appropriate choices based on his or her skills;
 3) participates in preparing his or her career plan.

 (10) A graduate of choice of professional curriculum has achieved the learning outcomes specified in subsections 3–9.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (11) The learning outcomes for core and elective studies modules in the choice of profession curriculum can be adjusted in the student’s individual curriculum, taking into consideration the student’s abilities and needs.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

Chapter 4 Third-level Vocational Training 

§ 14.  Third-level vocational training

 (1) Students in third-level vocational training acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes that correspond to the learning outcomes of the third qualification level.

 (2) A graduate of third-level vocational training has vocational, professional and occupational training that is in general sufficient for working in the basic professions categorized under the major group “Plant and machine operators and assemblers”, “Craft and related trades workers”, “Skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers” or “Service and sales workers”.

 (3) Third-level vocational training takes place solely according to initial training curricula.

 (4) Those starting study in third-level vocational training are not required to have basic education.

§ 15.  Volume of study

 (1) The volume of study in third-level vocational training is 30 to 120 credit points.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (2) Practical work and work practice together make up at least 50 per cent of the volume of vocational training and their proportions are generally equal.

§ 16.  Completion of studies and continuation of studies

 (1) Studies in third-level vocational training shall be considered completed after achieving the learning outcomes corresponding to the partial profession or qualification described in the curriculum.

 (2) The achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a professional examination, which may also be taken in parts. If it is not possible to take a professional examination in a profession or area of specialization, the studies shall be completed with a vocational examination. If the professional examination is not passed, the student has the right to take a vocational examination to complete studies. In the case of a student with special educational needs, the achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a vocational examination, which can be substituted by a professional examination.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (3) The school shall issue a leaving certificate along with a transcript to graduates of third-level vocational training.

 (4) Students in third-level vocational training may acquire basic education under the general procedure simultaneously with or after studies in vocational training. Graduates of third-level vocational training with basic education may commence acquiring secondary education at a vocational educational institution or upper secondary school.

§ 17.  Learning outcomes for third-level vocational training

 (1) Graduates of third-level vocational training shall have achieved the learning outcomes set out in this section.

 (2) Vocational and professional knowledge: knows and is familiar with the vocational and professional terminology, principles, technologies, processes, techniques, materials, tools, equipment and is able to use and apply them.

 (3) Vocational and professional skills and extent of independence and responsibility:
 1) is able to fulfil conventional work tasks with limited responsibility in his or her vocation or profession;
 2) is able to work independently and take responsibility for the results of his or her work in work situations, which are generally stable or change little;
 3) is responsible for fulfilling work duties.

 (4) Learning competence: learns and updates his or her knowledge independently.

 (5) Communicative competence:
 1) substantiates his or her standpoints and expresses himself or herself in various situations orally and in writing;
 2) uses general information sources in resolving vocational and professional issues.

 (6) Self-determination competence: is capable of solving vocational and professional issues optimally and change his or her behaviour as needed.

 (7) Performance competence: takes effectively part in different teams and is capable of fulfilling diverse roles in teams.

 (8) Information technology competence:
 1) knows the main possibilities and potential risks of information technology;
 2) is able to use the main possibilities of the internet for both personal and professional purposes.

 (9) Initiative and entrepreneurial competence:
 1) uses various tools for finding and executing ideas;
 2) expresses opinion on experience, describes, presents and assesses his or her ideas and work;
 3) sets career goals under supervision;
 4) finds, under supervision, information regarding jobs, including electronically;
 5) associates, under supervision, the requirements for professional training with possibilities for working on the labour market.

Chapter 5 Fourth-level Vocational Training 

§ 18.  Fourth-level vocational training

 (1) Students in fourth-level vocational training acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes that correspond to the learning outcomes of the fourth qualification level.

 (2) A graduate of fourth-level vocational training has vocational, professional and occupational training that is in general sufficient for working in the more advanced professions categorized under the major group “Plant and machine operators and assemblers”, “Craft and related trades workers”, “Skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers” or “Service and sales workers” or “Clerical support workers”.

 (3) Fourth-level vocational training takes place according to initial training and continuing training curricula.

 (4) The prerequisite for commencing studies in fourth-level initial training is the existence of basic education. Studies may also be commenced in vocational secondary education by persons who lack basic education and are at least 22 years of age and who have acquired competences corresponding to basic education.

 (5) The prerequisite for commencing studies in fourth-level continuing training is a third or fourth qualification level profession or the existence of corresponding competences and basic education.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

§ 19.  Volume of study

 (1) The volume of study in fourth-level initial training is 30 to 150 credit points, and in the music and performing arts curriculum group, up to 180 credit points.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (2) The volume of study in fourth-level continuing study is 15 to 60 credit points.

 (3) Practical work and work practice together make up at least 50 per cent of the volume of vocational training and their proportions are generally equal.

§ 20.  Completion of studies and continuation of studies

 (1) Studies in fourth-level vocational training shall be considered completed after achieving the learning outcomes corresponding to the partial profession or qualification described in the curriculum.

 (2) The achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a professional examination, which may also be taken in parts. If it is not possible to take a professional examination in a profession or area of specialization,, the studies shall be completed with a vocational examination. If the professional examination is not passed, the student has the right to take a vocational examination to complete studies. In the case of a student with special educational needs, the achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a vocational examination, which can be substituted by a professional examination.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (3) The school shall issue a leaving certificate along with a transcript to graduates of fourth-level vocational training.

 (4) Graduates of fourth-level vocational training may advance to continuing vocational training and, if they have secondary education, to professional higher education study or bachelor’s study.

§ 21.  Vocational secondary education

 (1) Fourth-level initial training may also take place on the basis of the vocational secondary education curriculum, upon completion of which in full and upon achieving the learning outcomes described in the curriculum, vocational secondary education is acquired.

 (2) The volume of the vocational secondary education curriculum is 180 credit points and includes at least 60 credit points in studies in key competences. Exceptions in regard to increasing the volume of the vocational secondary education curriculum are set forth in the relevant national curriculum. Key competences study is divided among the modules specified in subsections 3 and 4.

 (3) The vocational secondary education core studies modules have at least 30 credit points of integrated key competences study and their selection corresponding to the profile is set forth in the relevant national curriculum.

 (4) The volume of general studies modules is 30 credit points, and their list and volume and learning outcomes and assessment criteria at threshold level shall be set forth in the national curriculum.

 (5) Practical work and work practice together make up at least 35 per cent of the volume of vocational training and their proportions are generally equal.

 (6) The school shall issue a leaving certificate along with a transcript to those completing the vocational secondary education curriculum.

 (7) Taking of state examinations held on the basis of the Basic Schools and Upper Secondary Schools Act is voluntary upon acquiring vocational secondary education, except for the state examination in Estonian as a second language for those completing a curriculum in a language of instruction other than Estonian. The state examination may be substituted by passing a professional examination or vocational examination in Estonian.

 (8) The provisions of subsection 7 regarding the state examination in Estonian as a second language do not apply to studies taking place on the basis of foreign agreements.

 (9) Those who have acquired vocational secondary education have the opportunity to continue general education studies for up to one academic year in a vocational educational institution or upper secondary school in accordance with procedure governed by regulation of the minister for education and research established on the basis of subsection 35 (3) of the Vocational Educational Institutions Act.

§ 22.  Learning outcomes for fourth-level vocational training

 (1) A graduate of fourth-level vocational training shall have achieved the learning outcomes set out in this section.

 (2) Vocational and professional knowledge: knows and is familiar with the vocation and profession thoroughly, including knowing and applying the vocation’s principles, theories and technologies in both conventional and novel work situations.

 (3) Vocational and professional skills and extent of independence and responsibility:
 1) is able to independently fulfil, in his or her vocation or profession, work duties that require complicated and diverse, novel solutions;
 2) is responsible for fulfilling work duties.

 (4) Learning competence:
 1) learns and updates his or her knowledge independently in a self-guided manner;
 2) assesses and analyses his or her level of knowledge.

 (5) Communicative competence:
 1) substantiates his or her standpoints in detail and expresses them in various situations orally and in writing;
 2) uses specific information sources in resolving vocational and professional issues, evaluates the reliability and veracity of the information.

 (6) Self-determination competence:
 1) uses self-assessment for changing his or her behaviour;
 2) is capable of making proposals for improving work results.

 (7) Performance competence:
 1) takes effectively part in different teams and is capable of leading the teams where necessary;
 2) is capable of partially supervising co-workers.

 (8) Information technology competence:
 1) knows the role, possibilities and potential risks of information technology;
 2) is able to critically assess the reliability of available information;
 3) is able to use the main computer applications and the possibilities of the internet for both personal and professional purposes;
 4) is able to apply tools for creating, presenting and understanding information and to use internet-based search systems and other services.

 (9) Initiative and entrepreneurial competence:
 1) thinks systematically and creatively and is able to critically assess his or her ideas and independently find possibilities for executing them;
 2) initiates, develops and applies ideas;
 3) has basic knowledge in entrepreneurship;
 4) prepares, under supervision, a short-term and long-term career plan for himself or herself;
 5) independently finds ways for professional self-improvement and application on the labour market;
 6) associates, under supervision, the requirements for professional training with possibilities for working on the labour market.

§ 23.  Learning outcomes of vocational secondary education

 (1) A graduate of vocational secondary education studies shall have achieved the learning outcomes set out in this section, the competences of which shall be developed throughout the curriculum.

 (2) Vocational and professional knowledge:
 1) knows and is familiar with the vocation and profession thoroughly, including knowing and applying the vocation’s principles, theories and technologies in both conventional and novel work situations.
 2) associates vocational and professional knowledge with scientific methods, and the basic principles and processes of STEM fields;
 3) understands the development of scientific theories, applications and technologies and the related risks, values security and sustainable development.

 (3) Vocational and professional skills and extent of independence and responsibility:
 1) is able to independently fulfil, in his or her vocation or profession, work duties that require complicated and diverse, novel solutions;
 2) is responsible for fulfilling work duties.
 3) uses mathematical knowledge and methods in various walks of life;
 4) expresses himself or herself, presents and substantiates his or her standpoints both orally and in writing in correct Estonian and other languages at the level of an independent language user taking into account the communication situation and partners.

 (4) Learning competence:
 1) learns and updates his or her knowledge independently in a self-guided manner;
 2) assesses and analyses the level of his or her knowledge and skills, and if necessary, seeks advice, information and support;
 3) is able to use the content learned, including learning skills and strategies, in different contexts and in resolving problems;
 4) values the search for reasons and is able to assess their validity.

 (5) Communicative competence:
 1) substantiates his or her standpoints in detail and expresses them in various situations orally and in writing;
 2) uses specific information sources in resolving vocational and professional issues, gathers and processes information, and evaluates the reliability and veracity of information.
 3) articulates and expresses his or her oral and written arguments persuasively and in a context-appropriate manner.

 (6) Self-determination competence:
 1) uses self-assessment for changing his or her behaviour;
 2) is capable of making proposals for improving work results;
 3) is able to perceive and value his or her association with his or her own cultural heritage and contemporary cultural events and with those of other countries’ and people groups;
 4) is able to value and enjoy art and express himself or herself creatively;
 5) values orthography and language rich in expression;
 6) knows and values healthy ways of life, is capable of maintaining and, if necessary, restoring his or her mental and physical condition.

 (7) Performance competence:
 1) is able to realize himself or herself, act as a conscious and conscientious citizen and a society member, capable of dialogue, acts in a tolerant manner;
 2) takes effectively part in different teams and is capable of leading the teams where necessary;
 3) is capable of partially supervising co-workers;
 4) uses technological tools and scientific data to achieve a goal, make a decision or draw a conclusion.

 (8) Information technology competence:
 1) knows the role, possibilities and potential risks of information technology;
 2) is able to critically assess the reliability of available information;
 3) is able to use the main computer applications and the possibilities of the internet for both personal and professional purposes;
 4) is able to apply tools for creating, understanding and presenting information in correct language, and to use internet-based search systems and other services.

 (9) Initiative and entrepreneurial competence:
 1) thinks systematically and creatively and is able to critically assess his or her ideas and independently find possibilities for executing them;
 2) initiates, develops and applies ideas;
 3) has basic knowledge in entrepreneurship;
 4) prepares, under supervision, a short-term and long-term career plan for himself or herself;
 5) independently finds ways for professional self-improvement and application on the labour market;
 6) associates, under supervision, the requirements for professional training with possibilities for working on the labour market.

Chapter 6 Fifth-level Vocational Training 

§ 24.  Fifth-level vocational training

 (1) Students in fifth-level vocational training acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes that correspond to the learning outcomes of the fifth qualification level. Fifth-level vocational training is also termed vocational professional educational study.

 (2) Those completing fifth-level vocational training have vocational, professional and occupational training sufficient for working in the professions categorized under the occupational area’s major group "Mid-level specialists and technicians” or “Clerical support workers”.

 (3) A graduate of fifth-level vocational training has vocational, professional and occupational training that is in general sufficient for working in the more advanced professions categorized under the major group “Plant and machine operators and assemblers”, “Craft and related trades workers”, “Skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers” or “Service and sales workers” or “Clerical support workers”.

 (4) Study in fifth-level vocational training takes place on the basis of initial training and continuing training curricula.

 (5) The prerequisite for commencing studies in fifth-level initial training is the existence of secondary education.

 (6) The prerequisite for commencing studies in fifth-level continuing training is a fourth or fifth qualification level profession or the existence of corresponding competences and secondary education.

§ 25.  Volume of study

 (1) The volume of study in fifth-level vocational training is 60 to 150 credit points.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (2) The volume of study in fifth-level continuing study is 15 to 60 credit points.

 (3) Practical work and work practice together make up at least 50 per cent of the volume of vocational training and their proportions are generally equal.

§ 26.  Completion of studies and continuation of studies

 (1) Studies in fifth-level vocational training shall be considered completed after achieving the learning outcomes corresponding to the partial profession or qualification described in the curriculum.

 (2) The achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a professional examination, which may also be taken in parts. If it is not possible to take a professional examination in a profession or area of specialization, the studies shall be completed with a vocational examination. If the professional examination is not passed, the student has the right to take a vocational examination to complete studies. In the case of a student with special educational needs, the achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed through a vocational examination, which can be substituted by a professional examination.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

 (3) The school shall issue a leaving certificate along with a transcript to graduates of fifth-level vocational training.

 (4) A graduate of fifth-level vocational training may advance to continuing vocational training, professional higher education study or bachelor’s study.

§ 27.  Learning outcomes for fifth-level vocational training

 (1) A graduate of fifth-level vocational training shall have achieved the learning outcomes set out in this section.

 (2) Vocational and professional knowledge: knows and is familiar with the vocation and profession thoroughly, including knowing and applying the vocation’s principles, theories and technologies in both conventional and novel work situations.

 (3) Vocational and professional skills and extent of independence and responsibility:
 1) is able to independently fulfil, in his or her vocation or profession, work duties that go beyond the set framework and require complicated and diverse, creative and novel solutions;
 2) is able to select and use, for fulfilling work duties, suitable work and problem solving methods;
 3) is responsible for fulfilling work duties.

 (4) Learning competence:
 1) learns and updates his or her knowledge independently and in an self-guided manner, assesses his or her studies, determines the training need for self-improvement and continuing studies;
 2) assesses and analyses his or her level of knowledge.

 (5) Communicative competence:
 1) substantiates his or her standpoints in detail and also expresses them in novel situations, and communicates thoughts and intentions clearly and comprehensibly both orally and in writing.
 2) uses different and specific information sources in resolving vocational and professional issues.
 3) assesses the reliability and veracity of the information used.

 (6) Self-determination competence:
 1) uses self-assessment for changing his or her behaviour, taking into account the social context if needed;
 2) is capable of adequately assessing his or her work and to make proposals for improving work results and supervise colleagues in changing situations.

 (7) Performance competence:
 1) is capable of supervising colleague and to take partial responsibility for training them;
 2) takes part effectively in the work of different teams and is capable of forming and leading teams if necessary.

 (8) Information technology competence:
 1) knows the information and communication technologies necessary for the work;
 2) is able to critically assess the reliability of available information;
 3) is able to use the main computer applications and the possibilities of the internet for both personal and professional purposes;
 4) is able to apply tools for creating, presenting and understanding information and to find and use internet-based search systems and other services.

 (9) Initiative and entrepreneurial competence:
 1) is able to find and analyse relevant information for carrying out ideas and to assess the reliability of the source or treatment;
 2) is able to present and defend his or her positions and ideas in personal, public and official interactions and makes decisions and experiments;
 3) is able to prepare a business plan;
 4) prepares independently a short-term and long-term career plan for himself or herself;
 5) analyses and assesses independently his or her vocational, professional and occupational training and possibilities for employment and continuing study on the labour market.

Chapter 7 Principles for Recognition of Prior Learning and Professional Experience 

§ 28.  Objective of recognition of prior learning and professional experience

  The objective of recognition of prior learning and professional experience is:
 1) to value the person’s knowledge and skills, regardless of how and where they are acquired;
 2) to increase people’s educational and professional mobility and broaden the possibilities for lifelong learning;
 3) to allow lessons learned in formal education, other organized educational activity (non-formal learning) and work experience as well as learning outcomes of everyday activities and leisure time (informal learning) to be considered equivalent to learning outcomes achieved by fulfilling the admission requirements set forth in this regulation or by completing a curriculum;
 4) to allow the school to respond flexibly to changes taking place on the labour market and changes in the need for workforce.

§ 29.  General principles for recognition of prior learning and professional experience

 (1) The conditions and procedure for recognition of prior learning and professional experience shall be established in the school’s study procedures.

 (2) The principles of the Administrative Procedure Act and this regulation shall be the basis for establishing the conditions and procedure for recognition of prior learning and professional experience, the format for the application, assessment of the application, making a decision and contesting the decision.

 (3) Prior learning and professional experience may be applied in accordance with the procedure established in subsection 1:
 1) towards fulfilling the school’s admission conditions;
 2) towards completing the curriculum (except for passing a professional or vocational examination) by transferring learning outcomes for subjects, topics or modules previously passed and by recognizing prior learning or professional experience as the learning outcome of the subject, topic or module;
 3) towards completing vocational training by recognizing a previously passed professional examination as passing of a professional examination or vocational examination.

 (4) Upon organizing recognition of prior learning and professional experience, the school shall:
 1) notify students of the conditions and procedure for recognizing prior learning and professional experience, including the deadlines and expenses related to assessment and possibilities of contesting the results;
 2) ensure for the applicant for recognition of prior learning and professional experience the availability of the necessary information and supervision and guidance;
 3) ensure the uniformity of the procedure of recognition of prior learning and professional experience and the competence and impartiality of the persons conducting the assessment;
 4) create possibilities for the assessors to participate in continuing education and a cooperation network.

§ 30.  Substantiation and assessment of prior learning and professional experience

 (1) Prior study shall be certified with a diploma, certificate or other document certifying education.

 (2) Learning that had taken place in the prior professional experience, a vocational or other everyday activity shall be validated by a reference to the work completed and its presentation, portfolio of samples, professional certificate, copy of employment contract or directive of appointment to office, or other documentary evidence. Upon validating work experience, a description of work experience and a self-analysis shall be appended to the application.

 (3) In addition to the provisions of subsections 1 and 2, additional requirements for validation may be established in the school’s study procedures.

 (4) If necessary, the school has the right, for the purpose of evaluating a person’s prior study or professional experience, to assign practical assignments, interview the person or evaluate the person's knowledge and skills in another manner.

Chapter 8 Broad Groups of Study, Fields of Study and Curriculum Groups 

§ 31.  Broad groups of study, fields of study and curriculum groups

 (1) The classification of formal vocational education curricula into broad groups of study, fields of study and curriculum groups follows the International Standard Classification of Education: Fields of Education and Training (ISCED-F 2013).
[RT I, 16.07.2016, 5 - entered into force on 01.01.2017]

 (2) Curriculum groups shall be the basis for preparing national curricula.

§ 32.  Broad groups of study, fields of study and curriculum groups in which formal education in vocational training takes place

  [RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]
The broad groups of study, fields of study and curriculum groups in which formal vocational education takes place are set forth in Annex 2 of the regulation.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

Chapter 9 Implementing Provisions 

§ 33.  Transition

 (1) In the case of students admitted before the 2017-2018 academic year, the achieving of learning outcomes shall be assessed by way of a vocational examination, which can be substituted by a professional examination.
[RT I, 16.07.2016, 5 - entered into force on 01.09.2016]

 (2) Second-, third- and fourth-level initial studies curricula with an academic volume of 15-29 EKAP credits shall be valid until they are brought into conformity with this regulation and not later than 31 August 2020, at which point students whose studies are in progress shall be transferred to curricula which are in conformity with this regulation. Starting 1 January 2020, students will be admitted only to curricula which are in conformity with this regulation.
[RT I, 17.04.2019, 1 - entered into force on 20.04.2019]

§ 34.  Entry into force of regulation

  The regulation shall enter into force on 1 September 2013.


1 Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning 2006/962/EC (OJ L 394, 30.12.2006, p. 10)

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